The Knowledge library

Knowledge Library

Contributions to the Medical Education Partnership Initiative

Overview of CapacityPlus's support to build the capacity of MEPI-supported schools in three technical areas: graduate tracking, eLearning, and community-based education (CBE).

Compendium of Approaches and Tools for Expanding High-Quality Health Workforce Education and Training

This compendium categorizes and describes approaches and tools that national stakeholders can use to address common challenges in expanding high-quality education and training. It lists sources of globally-recognized, evidence-based guidelines and recommendations for scaling up and transforming health professional education. It then suggests resources to support the implementation of those recommendations, categorized in relation to the health workforce production pipeline framework.

Peer Review of the Community-Based Medical Education Program at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences

In collaboration with the PEPFAR Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) Community-Based Education (CBE) Technical Working Group and the MEPI Coordinating Center, CapacityPlus organized and conducted a peer review of the CBE program of the University of Zimbabwe College of Heath Sciences (UZCHS). The review was based on a validated methodology developed by the Collaboration for Health Equity through Education and Research (CHEER), which was formed in 2003 in South Africa to examine strategies that would increase the production of health professional graduates who choose to practice in rural and underserved areas of South Africa. The review served two purposes: 1) to provide a practical training experience in the CHEER peer review process for representatives from four MEPI-supported schools; and 2) to explore the strengths and weaknesses of the UZCHS field attachment program with respect to how well students are being prepared to serve in rural and underserved areas in Zimbabwe.

Christian Health Association of Malawi: General Report of the Health Workforce Productivity Assessment and Early Progress on Implementation of Improvement Interventions

Health workforce productivity measures the number of health services produced by health workers in a given period of time. Assessing health workforce productivity at the health facility level is a key step for developing and implementing effective improvement strategies. The Christian Health Association of Malawi, in collaboration with CapacityPlus, conducted a productivity assessment through a field test of CapacityPlus's Health Workforce Productivity Analysis and Improvement Toolkit. This report presents findings from the assessment as well as early progress from implementation of the improvement interventions through June 2015.

Strengthening School Management: A Guide for Optimizing the Use of Health Workforce Education Resources

Education and training institutions around the globe are struggling to meet the increasing demand for more high-quality health workers. A more business-like approach to operating and managing these institutions would allow schools to produce greater numbers of competent and qualified graduates within budget. This guide includes self-assessment against predefined management standards or good practices, followed by prioritization, goal-setting, planning, implementation, and monitoring of progress. The guide.also provides useful tools to support each step. Learn more about the guide and access tools.
 

Strengthening the Supply Chain Management Workforce in Namibia: Results of a Rapid Retention Survey for Pharmacists and Pharmacist Assistants

People that Deliver is a global initiative that aims to build global and national capacity to plan, finance, develop, support, and retain the national workforces needed for the effective, efficient, and sustainable management of health supply chains. The Ministry of Health and Social Services in Namibia requested People that Deliver to support the country in applying a set of targeted interventions to strengthen the supply chain management workforce. One of the interventions was a rapid retention survey to understand incentives and retention schemes needed to attract and retain pharmacists and pharmacist assistants to underserved public sector facilities across Namibia.CapacityPlus applied its Rapid Retention Survey Toolkit to determine the benefits and incentives most likely to attract and retain pharmacists and pharmacist assistants to rural, public sector services in Namibia. The findings are presented in this report.

Estimating the Institutional Costs of Educating and Training Health Workers: Preservice Education Costing Methodology and Instruments

CapacityPlus designed a costing study approach to: 1) estimate the financial costs to an educational institution and its associated clinical practice facilities of producing a graduate of a specific academic program; 2) identify the resource constraints to producing sufficient numbers of quality graduates; and 3) simulate the potential new unit cost to the educational institution and its associated clinical practice facilities if a scenario of interventions were introduced to increase the quantity and/or quality of graduates. The approach applies an Excel-based costing model and data collection instruments to analyze preservice education costing data derived from information about enrollment levels, curriculum data, school expenditures, payroll, available infrastructure and equipment, and others. Read more »

Successful mLearning Pilot in Senegal: Delivering Family Planning Refresher Training Using Interactive Voice Response and SMS

This article in the June 2015 issue of Global Health: Science and Practice highlights the results of an assessment CapacityPlus conducted in Senegal of a prototype mLearning system that uses interactive voice response (IVR) and text messaging on basic mobile phones. IVR allows trainees to respond to audio recordings using their telephone keypads. The pilot included offering a refresher training course on the management of contraceptive side effects and misconceptions to 20 public-sector nurses and midwives in working in Mékhé and Tivaouane districts in the Thiès region. The authors concluded that the mLearning system proved appropriate, feasible, and acceptable to trainees, and it was associated with sustained knowledge gains.